Comedian of Law

Learn & Laugh with the Comedian of Law.

Joel Oster reviews legal happenings, Supreme Court cases and other legal news, all with a healthy dose of humor.

De-Briefing the Law, Daily Update, July 2nd, 2021

In this Fourth of July edition of the Update, we dig into why the 1st Amendment makes America so great. Despite the many mistakes this country has made (most recently, freeing Bill Cosby instead of Brittney Spears), our freedoms are still worth celebrating!

Wishing you a great weekend!

 

In this episode, Joel is joined by Mackenzie Smith to discuss this week's legal happenings. As the public has been calling to "Free Brittney," the legal system apparently misunderstood and released Bill Cosby instead. Joel and Mackenzie dig into why this happened, the history of the case, and the procedural issues that led to his release. Next, they discuss the Supreme Court cases released this week. They talk about the major voting rights case based in Arizona in the 2020 election. The case brought up the question of whether certain voting practices were racially-motivated. Finally, Joel and Mackenzie give an additional overview of more Supreme Court issues.

 

Read our recent Supreme Court blogs:

Supreme Court review blog

Obamacare blog

NCAA blog

De-Briefing the Law, Daily Update, July 1st, 2021

In today's update, we wish the Justices a happy summer vacation as they finish up their term after today's decisions. We discuss a case on transgender rights to school restrooms that the Court declined to hear. We also talk about the voting rights case about Arizona voting practices regarding harvesting ballots and precinct voting. Lastly, we get into California's losses this Supreme Court season, including today's decision about releasing donor lists. 

This past Monday, the Supreme Court issued its ruling on the NCAA and how it compensates student athletes. Joel is joined by Christopher Marohn to talk about NCAA v. Alston. After sharing their love of sports, Joel and Chris dig into the legal details of the case. The athletes claim that NCAA compensation violates anti-trust law. The NCAA hinges its argument and defense on the idea of “amateurism” and that part of the allure of college sports is that money isn’t the key motivator for players. Joel and Chris reflect on the history of pay in college sports and how that impacts this decision. They also explore the NCAA business model and how a billion dollar business can get away without paying its workforce. The Court rules 9-0 in favor of the student athletes, ruling that there cannot be restrictions on education-related compensation. Listen for a thorough exploration of sports pay and the ramifications of this case.

De-Briefing the Law, Daily Update, June 24th, 2021

Yesterday, the Supreme Court issued 4 big decisions. In the first case, the justices side with a cheerleader who was suspended from her team for cursing outside of school. Next, the Court deals with property rights versus unions. Then, the Court rules on 4th Amendment rights when a police officer entered a man's garage after he played his music too loud and didn't pull over. Lastly, the Court dealt with separation of powers with the limitations on who could remove the director of the FHFA.

The cases discussed:

Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L.

Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid

Lange v. California

Collins v. Yellen

 

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We offer comedic Continuing Legal Education courses: 

https://onlinecles.com

Our Blog:

https://onlinecles.com/blog/

De-Briefing the Law, Daily Update, June 23rd, 2021

On Monday, the Supreme Court released its decision on NCAA v. Alston. The case dealt with antitrust law and whether the NCAA could neglect to pay their student athletes based on the the premise of "amateurism." In an unanimous decision, the Court upheld the lower court's opinion that barred the NCAA from restricting education-related benefits like computers, instruments, and internships. 

 

For more comedic takes on the law, follow us:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/comedianoflaw

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedian_of...

Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/comedianoflaw

We offer comedic Continuing Legal Education courses: 

https://onlinecles.com

Our Blog:

https://onlinecles.com/blog/

This week, Joel is joined by Mackenzie Smith to review recent Supreme Court happenings. Will Justice Breyer retire? Are the justices making a statement about court packing with their 9-0 unanimous decisions? Joel and Mackenzie dig into these questions as well as the major cases that the Court decided this past week. First, they get into Terry v. The United States, drug sentencing and the First Step Act, and the difference between crack and powder cocaine. Next, they get into California v. Texas and the evolution of Obamacare before the Supreme Court. They discuss what the Affordable Care Act looks like with a zero penalty mandate. Finally, they debrief Fulton v. The City of Philadelphia. This case dealt with the Catholic church and whether the city could deny working with the Catholic church in the foster care system due to its religious beliefs about marriage. Listen for an analysis of recent SCOTUS news!

De-Briefing the Law, Daily Update, June. 18th, 2021

Yesterday was a big day on the Supreme Court. The Court released its decision on the fate of the Affordable Care Act, dismissing the challenge based on standing. This wasn't Obamacare's first time before the Court, so we review past constitutional questions and what the future of the ACA may look like. The Court also came to a 9-0 agreement in the case of Fulton v. Philadelphia. This case dealt with the Catholic church and whether the city could deny working with the Catholic church in the foster care system due to its religious beliefs about marriage.

Debriefing the Law, Daily Update | June 15th, 2021

In today's update, Joel reviews yesterday's Supreme Court decisions: Terry v. United States and Greer v. United States. In Terry v. U.S., the Court discusses a Congressional mistake on how cocaine law has been ruled on previously. Apparently, there were different sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. In Greer v. U.S., the Court rules on the timeline a lawyer has to bring up any trial mistakes. 

Stay tuned for more updates as the Supreme Court still has many major decisions coming out this month!

In today's episode, Joel and Amy discuss a lawsuit against the Queen of England for $32 trillion. Let's hope the attorney got his retainer upfront. Then, Joel explores other crazy and frivolous cases. They also go over deposition preparation and what the worst answer a client can give is. Finally, Joel and Amy dive into recent Supreme Court cases and big decisions still to come.

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